Fantine and valjean relationship quotes

The character of Jean Valjean in Les Miserables from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

fantine and valjean relationship quotes

11 quotes have been tagged as jean-valjean: Victor Hugo: 'These two beings, who had loved each other so Victor Hugo, Fantine: Les Misérables #1. Everything you ever wanted to know about the quotes talking about Family in Les Even nasty old Madame Thénardier get all squishy inside when Fantine. The Les Miserables quotes below are all either spoken by Jean Valjean or refer to Jean Valjean. .. People conclude that he had some sort of relationship. Madeleine brings Fantine into the infirmary, and then goes out to make inquiries.

The hydra at the beginning, the angel at the end. The novel contains various subplots, but the main thread is the story of ex-convict Jean Valjeanwho becomes a force for good in the world but cannot escape his criminal past. The novel is divided into five volumes, each volume divided into several books, and subdivided into chapters, for a total of 48 books and chapters.

Each chapter is relatively short, commonly no longer than a few pages. The novel as a whole is one of the longest ever written[5] with approximately 1, pages in unabridged English-language editions, [6] and 1, pages in French.

It addresses England as well as Spain, Italy as well as France, Germany as well as Ireland, the republics that harbour slaves as well as empires that have serfs. Social problems go beyond frontiers. Humankind's wounds, those huge sores that litter the world, do not stop at the blue and red lines drawn on maps. Wherever men go in ignorance or despair, wherever women sell themselves for bread, wherever children lack a book to learn from or a warm hearth, Les Miserables knocks at the door and says: Digressions More than a quarter of the novel—by one count of 2, pages—is devoted to essays that argue a moral point or display Hugo's encyclopedic knowledge, but do not advance the plot, nor even a subplot, a method Hugo used in such other works as The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Toilers of the Sea.

One biographer noted that "the digressions of genius are easily pardoned". The one about convents he titles "Parenthesis" to alert the reader to its irrelevance to the story line. It opens volume 2 with such a change of subject as to seem the beginning of an entirely different work. The fact that this 'digression' occupies such a large part of the text demands that it be read in the context of the 'overarching structure' discussed above.

Hugo draws his own personal conclusions, taking Waterloo to be a pivot-point in history, but definitely not a victory for the forces of reaction. Waterloo, by cutting short the demolition of European thrones by the sword, had no other effect than to cause the revolutionary work to be continued in another direction.

The slashers have finished; it was the turn of the thinkers. The century that Waterloo was intended to arrest has pursued its march. That sinister victory was vanquished by liberty. The novel opens with a statement about the bishop of Digne in and immediately shifts: One of the strangers was a man who had stolen a loaf of bread similar to Jean Valjean. The officer was taking him to the coach. The thief also saw the mother and daughter playing with each other which would be an inspiration for Fantine and Cosette.

Hugo imagined the life of the man in jail and the mother and daughter taken away from each other. Vidocq became the head of an undercover police unit and later founded France's first private detective agency. He was also a businessman and was widely noted for his social engagement and philanthropy. He went to Toulon to visit the Bagne in and took extensive notes, though he did not start writing the book until On one of the pages of his notes about the prison, he wrote in large block letters a possible name for his hero: He used a short part of his dialogue with the police when recounting Valjean's rescue of Fantine in the novel.

In December he witnessed an altercation between an old woman scavenging through rubbish and a street urchin who might have been Gavroche. He also slipped personal anecdotes into the plot.

He sleeps on the street, angry and bitter. Digne's benevolent Bishop Myriel gives him shelter. At night, Valjean runs off with Myriel's silverware. When the police capture Valjean, Myriel pretends that he has given the silverware to Valjean and presses him to take two silver candlesticks as well, as if he had forgotten to take them.

The police accept his explanation and leave. Myriel tells Valjean that his life has been spared for God, and that he should use money from the silver candlesticks to make an honest man of himself. Valjean broods over Myriel's words. When opportunity presents itself, purely out of habit, he steals a sous coin from year-old Petit Gervais and chases the boy away.

He quickly repents and searches the city in panic for Gervais. At the same time, his theft is reported to the authorities.

Death Of Valjean-Les Miserables

Valjean hides as they search for him, because if apprehended he will be returned to the galleys for life as a repeat offender. Walking down the street, he sees a man named Fauchelevent pinned under the wheels of a cart.

When no one volunteers to lift the cart, even for pay, he decides to rescue Fauchelevent himself. He crawls underneath the cart, manages to lift it, and frees him.

fantine and valjean relationship quotes

The town's police inspector, Inspector Javertwho was an adjutant guard at the Bagne of Toulon during Valjean's incarceration, becomes suspicious of the mayor after witnessing this remarkable feat of strength.

He has known only one other man, a convict named Jean Valjean, who could accomplish it. The men abandon the women, treating their relationships as youthful amusements. Fantine is unaware that they are abusing her daughter and using her as forced labor for their inn, and continues to try to meet their growing, extortionate and fictitious demands. She is later fired from her job at Jean Valjean's factory, because of the discovery of her daughter, who was born out of wedlock.

Fantine is slowly dying from an unspecified disease. A dandy named Bamatabois harasses Fantine in the street, and she reacts by striking him. She begs to be released so that she can provide for her daughter, but Javert sentences her to six months in prison. Valjean Mayor Madeleine intervenes and orders Javert to release her.

Javert resists but Valjean prevails. Valjean, feeling responsible because his factory turned her away, promises Fantine that he will bring Cosette to her.

He takes her to a hospital. Javert comes to see Valjean again. Javert admits that after being forced to free Fantine, he reported him as Valjean to the French authorities. He tells Valjean he realizes he was wrong, because the authorities have identified someone else as the real Jean Valjean, have him in custody, and plan to try him the next day. Valjean is torn, but decides to reveal himself to save the innocent man, whose real name is Champmathieu.

He travels to attend the trial and there reveals his true identity. Fantine discovers that Cosette is not at the hospital and fretfully asks where she is. Javert orders her to be quiet, and then reveals to her Valjean's real identity. Weakened by the severity of her illness, she falls back in shock and dies.

Valjean goes to Fantine, speaks to her in an inaudible whisper, kisses her hand, and then leaves with Javert. Later, Fantine's body is unceremoniously thrown into a public grave. The king commutes his sentence to penal servitude for life. While imprisoned in the Bagne of ToulonValjean, at great personal risk, rescues a sailor caught in the ship's rigging.

Spectators call for his release. Valjean fakes his own death by allowing himself to fall into the ocean. Authorities report him dead and his body lost. Valjean arrives at Montfermeil on Christmas Eve. He finds Cosette fetching water in the woods alone and walks with her to the inn. Valjean leaves and returns to make Cosette a present of an expensive new doll which, after some hesitation, she happily accepts.

Jean Valjean Quotes (11 quotes)

He informs Valjean that he cannot release Cosette without a note from the child's mother. Valjean and Cosette flee to Paris. Valjean rents new lodgings at Gorbeau House, where he and Cosette live happily. However, Javert discovers Valjean's lodgings there a few months later. Valjean takes Cosette and they try to escape from Javert. They soon find shelter in the Petit-Picpus convent with the help of Fauchelevent, the man whom Valjean once rescued from being crushed under a cart and who has become the convent's gardener.

Valjean also becomes a gardener and Cosette becomes a student at the convent school. Lamarque was a victim of a major cholera epidemic that had ravaged the city, particularly its poor neighborhoods, arousing suspicion that the government had been poisoning wells. One of the students, Marius Pontmercyhas become alienated from his family especially his grandfather M.

Gillenormand because of his liberal views. At the Luxembourg GardenMarius falls in love with the now grown and beautiful Cosette. To impress him, she tries to prove her literacy by reading aloud from a book and by writing "The Cops Are Here" on a sheet of paper. Marius pities her and gives her some money. The philanthropist and his daughter enter—actually Valjean and Cosette. Marius immediately recognizes Cosette. After seeing them, Valjean promises them he will return with rent money for them.

Javert gives Marius two pistols and instructs him to fire one into the air if things get dangerous.

Jean Valjean Quotes

Marius returns home and waits for Javert and the police to arrive. Valjean tries to escape through a window but is subdued and tied up. He also orders Valjean to write a letter to Cosette to return to the apartment, and they would keep her with them until he delivers the money.

It is during this time that Valjean manages to free himself. Valjean manages to escape the scene before Javert sees him. She leads him to Valjean's and Cosette's house on Rue Plumet, and Marius watches the house for a few days.

He and Cosette then finally meet and declare their love for one another. One night, during one of Marius's visits with Cosette, the six men attempt to raid Valjean's and Cosette's house.

Hearing this, they reluctantly retire. Meanwhile, Cosette informs Marius that she and Valjean will be leaving for England in a week's time, which greatly troubles the pair. The next day, Valjean is sitting in the Champ de Mars. Unexpectedly, a note lands in his lap, which says "Move Out. He goes back to his house, tells Cosette they will be staying at their other house on Rue de l'Homme Arme, and reconfirms to her that they will be moving to England.

Marius tries to get permission from M. Gillenormand to marry Cosette. His grandfather seems stern and angry, but has been longing for Marius's return. When tempers flare, he refuses his assent to the marriage, telling Marius to make Cosette his mistress instead. She is also unaware that the letters they send to her requesting financial help for Cosette are their own fraudulent way to extort money from her for themselves. Loss of work[ edit ] Fantine is fired by a meddlesome supervisor, Madame Victurnien, without the knowledge of the mayor, when she finds out that Fantine is an unwed mother.

Her overworking causes her to become sick with a cough and fever. She also rarely goes out, fearing the disgrace she would face from the townspeople. To buy the skirt herself, Fantine has her hair cut off and sold. She then says to herself "My child is no longer cold, I have clothed her with my hair.

fantine and valjean relationship quotes

She later takes on a lover, only for him to beat her and then abandon her. In order to continue to earn money for Cosette, Fantine becomes a prostitute. During a January evening, a dandy called Bamatabois heckles her and shoves snow down the back of her dress when she ignores him. Fantine ferociously attacks him.

Javertthe town's police inspector, immediately arrests her while Bamatabois sneaks away. She begs to be let go, but Javert sentences her to six months in prison. Valjean arrives to help Fantine, but upon seeing him she spits in his face.

fantine and valjean relationship quotes

Dismissing the act, Valjean orders Javert to free Fantine, which he reluctantly does. Valjean comes to find out the reasons Fantine became a prostitute and why she attacked Bamatabois. He feels sorry for the innocent Fantine and Cosette, and tells her that he will retrieve Cosette for her. He sends Fantine to the hospital, as she is suffering from tuberculosis. Death[ edit ] After Valjean reveals his true identity at Champmathieu 's trial, he goes back to see Fantine at the hospital.

She asks about Cosette, and the doctor lies to her saying that Cosette is at the hospital but cannot see Fantine until her health improves. She is appeased by this, and even mistakenly thinks that she hears Cosette laughing and singing. When Cosette has a dream about her mother as an angel, she remarks that her mother must have been a saint.

Valjean replies, "through martyrdom". She is fourteen years old, and fresh out of the convent, so he pays little attention to her.

After a few months, Marius notices her and sees that she has grown to be an extremely beautiful young woman.

Soon Cosette and Marius exchange glances and fall in love. Valjean notices how attentive Marius is to their movements. She was very young. When he learns that Marius has followed them home and inquired about them, he quickly moves to a more obscure address with Cosette. Marius watches Cosette for a few nights before approaching her.

When Cosette and Marius finally meet again in the garden, they confess their mutual love, share their first kiss, and introduce themselves. They continue to meet in secret. The same night, Cosette informs Marius that she and Valjean will be departing for England soon. This news devastates them both, because it will mean the end of their relationship.

Marius briefly attempts to obtain money and permission to marry from his grandfather to circumvent this issue. Their discussion dissolves into a heated argument stemming from the grandfather's suggestion to "Make her Cosette your Marius' mistress", and Marius storms out. Valjean considers this in horror for a few days, then informs Cosette they will move to their other house and will be in England in a week. Cosette quickly writes a letter to Marius with this information.

Marius writes a farewell letter to Cosette, which is delivered to Valjean by Gavroche. After the battle is over, he takes Marius' unconscious body through the sewers. After, quite literally, dragging Marius through quicksand in the sewer, Valjean finally manages to get Marius through the sewers alive. Javert helps Valjean return Marius to his grandfather's house, and Valjean requests to be brought home to say goodbye to Cosette before being sent back to the galleys.