Esl meet and greet games

ESL First Day Introduction Games

esl meet and greet games

Start your English as a Second Language (ESL) class for adults off with an 23 Best Icebreaker Games for Adults [Updated] - Icebreaker Ideas Meeting Games. Free instructions to icebreaker games and activities ideal for small groups (two to five people). Want your ESL students to get to know each other and work cooperatively? It can really boost English learning -- try out these fun games ASAP and see the.

Explain that the two teams are going to have a snowball fight. When you say 'go', the snowball fight commences. When you shout 'stop', anyone holding a snowball must open up the paper and find the person whose name is written inside.

The student then introduces the person to the class using the information written on the paper in the third-person, e. He is 11 years old', etc. When the introductions have been made, the corresponding snowballs are removed from the game.

esl meet and greet games

The two teams continue the snowball fight until everyone has been introduced to the class. You can also use this game to review question and answer forms by writing a question inside each snowball. When you shout 'stop', anyone holding a snowball must answer the question written inside. The game also helps you gain insight into your students' level of English. Before you begin the game, don't give the students any information about yourself or the course. Tell the students to work alone and write some questions that they would like to ask you.

The questions can be about anything they want to know about you or the course. If you have a large class, ask each student to write three questions. If it is a small class, ask each student to write five. While the students are writing, put the students' names on the board. When everyone has prepared their questions, ask a student to come to the front of the class.

Tell the class that the student at the front of the class is going to take on the role of the teacher and attempt to answer another student's questions. The student then tries to guess the answers to the questions asked by a classmate.

It's important not to reveal how the game works until the students have written all their questions as this may affect the questions the students write. While the student is answering the questions, you keep score.

Meeting and greeting games/ worksheets | TEFLtastic

The student scores one point for a correct or close enough answer. If the student gives an incorrect answer, write an 'X' next to their score. The classmate asking the question should also mark an 'X' next to the corresponding question. The game continues with students taking it in turns to be the teacher and guess the answers to a classmate's questions until everyone has asked and answered one set of questions.

Afterwards, tell the students to ask you the questions marked 'X' that were left unanswered. In the game, students race to give basic personal information about themselves and repeat other students' information. Arrange the students into two teams and sit each team in a circle. Tell the teams that they are going to race each other to say everyone's name in their team.

Give the first student in each team a ball. The first student begins by saying their name, e. The first student then passes the ball to the second student. The second student repeats the first student's name and then says their own name, e.

small group icebreakers games

The second student passes the ball to the next student. The next student continues, e. She's Kate, and I'm Amiko'. The game continues until all the names have been said. If a student forgets the name of a teammate, the team starts over from the first student. The first team to finish wins the round and scores a point. Then, start with a different student and repeat the game with other personal information, e. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

This introduction game works best with young learners. Begin the game by saying, "I'm the captain of a spaceship. I'm going on a trip to the moon. Who wants to go with me and what are you going to bring? Hi, my name is The students who are allowed to go are the ones who bring something that begins with the first letter of their name. However, don't explain this to the students. It's up to them to work it out! The first student then stands up and says, "Hi, my name is If a student manages to work it out or accidentally says an item matching with the first letter of their name, you accept them on board and write up their name.

Eventually, most of the students will understand the game when they see that some students are allowed to go. You can also have the students give more information about themselves e.

This game helps you to introduce yourself to the class and gives you insight into your students' level of English. Before you start the game, cover the board with information about yourself. Next to each piece of information write a number. The type and amount of information you write will depend on the level of your class, e.

Next, divide the students into two teams A and B. Tell the class that on the board is information about yourself. Explain that the aim of the game is for teams to choose a number and ask a question that they think matches with the answer on the board. Tell the students that for some answers many questions may be possible, but only one question is correct.

Teams then take it in turns to choose a number and ask a question. The students then read the cards and match them together to make two dialogues. When the students have finished, the pairs read out their dialogues to the class. Next, the students reshuffle the cards and spread them out face down on the desk. Students then take it in turns to turn over two cards face up.

If the cards make a matching pair, the student says the two lines aloud and keeps the cards.

esl meet and greet games

If the two cards don't match, the student turns them back over, keeping them in the same place and it's the other student's turn to play. The student with the most cards at the end of the game wins.

Portraits ESL Introducing Yourself Activity - Drawing, Listening and Speaking - Elementary - 30 minutes Here is an insightful worksheet activity to help students introduce themselves and find out each other's names. The students are divided into groups of 12 and each group sits in a circle. Each student is then given a copy of the worksheet. Students begin by randomly drawing a portrait of themselves in one of the picture frames on the worksheet.

When the students have finished drawing, they pass their worksheet to the person sitting on their right. Students then draw themselves again anywhere on the worksheet and pass it to the person on their right. This process is repeated until the students receive the worksheet they started with, complete with pictures in every frame.

The students then go around the group identifying their classmates from the portraits, finding out their names and introducing themselves. Greetings and Introductions ESL Greetings and Making Introductions Activity - Reading and Writing - Pre-intermediate - 25 minutes This compelling worksheet activity helps to teach students language for greetings, making introductions, small talk and ending a conversation.

The students are divided into groups of three and each student is given a copy of the worksheet. In their groups, students role-play a dialogue from the worksheet. When the students have finished, they write down the language that was used in the conversation to greet someone, introduce someone, make small talk, end the conversation and say goodbye. Afterwards, the language is reviewed with the class and the students suggest other possible phrases for each function.

40 FREE ESL meeting worksheets

In their groups, students then write a similar dialogue where they greet each other, make introductions and small talk, and say goodbye. These dialogues are then presented to the class and feedback is given. Meet and Greet ESL Greetings and Making Introductions Role-Play - Listening and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 25 minutes This engaging role-play activity helps to teach students various formal and informal phrases for greetings and making introductions.

The class is divided into groups of four. Each group is then split into pairs and the students are given a corresponding Student A, B, C or D role card. Students write their partner's name on the card. Each student then greets or introduces themselves to a student in the other pair using introductory phrases on their card. After the students have introduced themselves, they ask follow-up questions from the card and get to know each other.

The students then introduce their friend to the person they are speaking to using a given phrase on the card. Afterwards, the students swap roles and repeat the activity to give them practice at using the other introductory phrases. Finally, the groups act out their role-plays in front of the class and feedback is given.

Meeting and greeting games/ worksheets

Pleased to meet you ESL Greetings and Making Introductions Activity - Matching and Reading - Pre-intermediate - 30 minutes Here is a great activity for teaching or reviewing formal and informal phrases for greetings, making introductions and saying goodbye. The students are divided into groups of three. Each group is given a set of cards, which they shuffle and spread out face down on the desk. Students then take it in turns to turn over two cards.

The aim of the game is to find the beginning and ending of a phrase for greeting, introducing or saying goodbye. If a student matches a beginning and ending successfully, they say the phrase aloud, keep the cards and have another turn. If two cards don't match, they are turned back over and it's the next student's turn to play.

esl meet and greet games

When the students have finished, they sort the cards into a conversation between three people. When the students have done this, they take on the role of the three people in the conversation and role-play the dialogue together. Afterwards, the conversation and phrases are checked with the class. The students then say which phrases they think are formal and informal and suggest other language that could be used in the conversation.

As an extension, the students create a similar conversation using the language from the activity.